electricpower:

Drop-in LED bulb could save the energy of 210 power plants | DVICE

The Philips Master LEDTube InstantFit lamp solves this problem by offering the first true drop-in LED replacement tube. While this isn’t the first LED substitute for a T8 lamp, it is the first that doesn’t require rewiring the fixture to bypass the old fluorescent tube electronic ballast. That might sound like a small thing, but it means that the lamps can be switched over to LED by a maintenance worker in a couple of minutes, instead of requiring the work of an electrician. When you’ve got hundreds of lamps in a large supermarket or other business, that can mean the difference between changing the lamps in an afternoon, and taking on a project lasting several weeks.


This is huge for my lightboxes.

electricpower:

Drop-in LED bulb could save the energy of 210 power plants | DVICE

The Philips Master LEDTube InstantFit lamp solves this problem by offering the first true drop-in LED replacement tube. While this isn’t the first LED substitute for a T8 lamp, it is the first that doesn’t require rewiring the fixture to bypass the old fluorescent tube electronic ballast. That might sound like a small thing, but it means that the lamps can be switched over to LED by a maintenance worker in a couple of minutes, instead of requiring the work of an electrician. When you’ve got hundreds of lamps in a large supermarket or other business, that can mean the difference between changing the lamps in an afternoon, and taking on a project lasting several weeks.

This is huge for my lightboxes.

thisistheverge:

Motorola Droid Mini review: searching for a tiny flagship smartphone
“Check out this screen, this thing is huge.” It all started in 2011. Poor souls waiting in long Apple Store lines craned their necks to catch a glimpse of a big new phone that no one yet recognized. It was the Samsung Galaxy S II, with a bright and colorful 4.3-inch display that dwarfed the newly released iPhone 4S. Samsung’s message was simple: the next big thing is already here. And it kept on growing. 

I don’t want to use a phone almost the size of my iPad mini and I never will. iPhone’s size is part of the reason why I like it so much. It’s big enough to use as an entertainment device and small enough to fit perfectly in hand and in my pocket. I hope it doesn’t change much from the 5s form factor. I do hope an edge to edge display is in it’s future though. :)

thisistheverge:

Motorola Droid Mini review: searching for a tiny flagship smartphone

“Check out this screen, this thing is huge.” It all started in 2011. Poor souls waiting in long Apple Store lines craned their necks to catch a glimpse of a big new phone that no one yet recognized. It was the Samsung Galaxy S II, with a bright and colorful 4.3-inch display that dwarfed the newly released iPhone 4S. Samsung’s message was simple: the next big thing is already here. And it kept on growing. 

I don’t want to use a phone almost the size of my iPad mini and I never will. iPhone’s size is part of the reason why I like it so much. It’s big enough to use as an entertainment device and small enough to fit perfectly in hand and in my pocket. I hope it doesn’t change much from the 5s form factor. I do hope an edge to edge display is in it’s future though. :)

braxy29:

slowartday:

Bill FitzGibbons

Built in 1931, this Art Deco railroad underpass in Birmingham, Alabama is a vital gateway between the heart of downtown and a new urban space called Railroad Park. In recent years the dark tunnel had deteriorated into an unwelcoming and potentially dangerous area, so the city hired sculptor and public artist Bill FitzGibbons to create a lighting solution that would encourage more pedestrian traffic. Titled LightRails the installation is composed of a network of computerized LEDs that that form various lighting patterns in the previously darkened underpass. (via)

i had seen the first image before, but not the others; i was uncertain at the time whether i liked this. turns out to be really awesome. :)